Assisted Living Facilities – Fall Injuries

On January 15, 2020, a California jury awarded $5.5 million to the resident of an assisted living facility who sustained serious injuries due to a fall. According to the CDC: One in four Americans aged 65+ falls each year Emergency departments treat three million older people for fall injuries each year, an average of one… Continue reading

Fall injuries can affect older adults living in assisted living facilities.

On January 15, 2020, a California jury awarded $5.5 million to the resident of an assisted living facility who sustained serious injuries due to a fall.

According to the CDC:

  • One in four Americans aged 65+ falls each year
  • Emergency departments treat three million older people for fall injuries each year, an average of one every eleven seconds
  • One in five falls causes a serious injury, such as broken bones or a head injury

With the increasing growth of the Baby Boomers entering old age, fall injuries are increasingly common in assisted living facilities.

Assisted living facilities rarely accept responsibility for fall injuries. They claim residents live independently in their own quarters and receive limited assistance with meals, medication and housekeeping service. Even for those who receive enhanced services or additional supervision, they argue it is not reasonable to anticipate when the residents might fall.

However, assisted living facilities have a legal obligation to identify and address risks of their residents, including their specific fall risks.

 

What to do if your loved one falls in an assisted living facility?

If a fall occurs, first and foremost, ensure a thorough medical evaluation is completed. This is particularly important if the resident suffers from any cognitive deficits or confusion. The fall injuries may not be recognized immediately, even if one is not confused.

Second, if the facility cannot adequately explain the event in detail or you suspect something is wrong, calling the abuse and neglect hotline is an option. The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services hotline is 1-800-392-0210. The Illinois Department of Public Health hotline is 800-252-4343. State inspectors will show up for an unannounced inspection of the facility, demand the resident’s records and conduct employee interviews.

 

Investigating Liability of Assisted Living Facility After a Fall?

Complete records from the assisted living facility are critical, but it is all too often an insurmountable hurdle for those unfamiliar with the legal paperwork. Even after submitting all the correct paperwork, one may not receive complete records unless and until someone familiar with such records confronts the facility about what is missing. One such facility refused to produce its records after five requests. It took filing a lawsuit to get records.

Liability might be due to an incomplete or inaccurate assessment, the wrong care plan or the failure of staff to follow the plan. A breakdown in leadership tends to cause a cascade of problems. On the other hand, it is also possible that the facility was doing everything it was supposed to do.

 

What Should You Do After a Loved One is Injured?

ACT QUICKLY!!! The law has certain deadlines to assert claims. Oftentimes, it takes months of gathering enough information to evaluate the viability of a lawsuit.

Some people do not do anything. They reason that it does not heal the injury or bring their deceased loved one back. Others make a claim because they do not want someone else to suffer the same fate.

Most assisted living facilities are owned by corporate conglomerates that are more focused on profits than patient care. If left unaccountable, such facilities will not change their dangerous ways. Making them accountable is one way to incentivize them to do things the right way.

Assisted living facilities absolutely must ensure that services they provide are sufficient to meet the needs of their residents. If a resident requires more assistance than the facility provides, that resident cannot be admitted or remain in the facility.

In evaluating and prosecuting lawsuits against assisted living facilities, Goldenberg, Heller & Antognoli stays abreast of the statutory and regulatory requirements. Our attorneys know how to gather the available evidence and retain some of the best experts the medical profession has to offer. We would be happy to talk with you if you or your loved one who has suffered an injury in an assisted living facility.

CPA Firms Need Legal Advice, Too

Certified Public Accountants serve as trusted advisors and often guide their clients to other professionals, including attorneys, for assistance. However, CPA firms, like most professionals, often overlook their own need for good legal advice.   Engagement Letters For example, CPA firms should have a clear and concise engagement letter for all clients. These carefully drafted… Continue reading

CPA firms can benefit from hiring a trusted attorney to handle their legal documentation

Certified Public Accountants serve as trusted advisors and often guide their clients to other professionals, including attorneys, for assistance. However, CPA firms, like most professionals, often overlook their own need for good legal advice.

 

Engagement Letters

For example, CPA firms should have a clear and concise engagement letter for all clients. These carefully drafted documents set forth the specific understanding of a particular engagement when it comes to the scope of the CPA firm’s work. Services, such as tax return preparation and financial statement review, must be outlined accordingly.

In addition, the engagement letter should contain provisions that limit the CPA firm’s exposure to liability. This can include an exculpatory provision that limits the CPA firm’s liability to the amount of fees it has collected from its client. This is an advantage CPA firms have over attorneys, who cannot similarly limit their liability to a client.

 

Shareholder Agreements

Many CPA firms are corporations, partnerships or limited liability companies. This means they may have multiple shareholders, partners or members. As a result, they should have a sound shareholder agreement that addresses the respective rights and obligations of each shareholder, partner or member.

These agreements should contain provisions regarding:

  • Governance
  • Restrictions on transfer of ownership interests
  • Terms for transfer of the ownership interest of a deceased or disabled owner

The agreements should also cover any disputes that may arise in the operation of the firm and provide an expeditious and cost effective way for resolution of such disputes.

 

Additional Protections Legal Advice and Documentation for CPA Firms

Finally, like any business, a CPA firm, should seek legal counsel for matters such as:

  • Employment agreements, including non-solicitation covenants which can protect the CPA firm and its clients
  • Intellectual property rights (trademarks, trade names, etc.)
  • Insurance needs

Maintenance of a good relationship with a trusted attorney; one who can provide the legal “nuts and bolts” of operating a CPA firm, along with guidance on general legal questions or issues that arise during the course of operations, can be a valuable asset for any CPA firm. At Goldenberg Heller & Antognoli, P.C. our attorneys have experience in business and commercial law, and several have worked as licensed CPAs. Contact us to learn more. 800-782-8492.

Goldenberg Heller & Antognoli Repurposes Holiday Funds, Donates to Local Organizations

The Southern Illinois Laborers Union, Good Samaritan House, The RITE Plan Initiative and STL Village among those to receive firm’s holiday gift. In lieu of its annual holiday party, Edwardsville-based law firm Goldenberg Heller & Antognoli has donated more than $10,000 to four local organizations across the region. The Southern Illinois Laborers Union, the Good… Continue reading

The Southern Illinois Laborers Union, Good Samaritan House, The RITE Plan Initiative and STL Village among those to receive firm’s holiday gift.

In lieu of its annual holiday party, Edwardsville-based law firm Goldenberg Heller & Antognoli has donated more than $10,000 to four local organizations across the region. The Southern Illinois Laborers Union, the Good Samaritan House in Granite City, Ill., The RITE Plan Initiative in East St. Louis, Ill., and STL Village in St. Louis will all receive a portion of the firm’s gift.

The donations will be used to support each organization’s ongoing mission, which includes improving the lives of community members throughout the holiday season.

The Southern Illinois Laborers Union – Funds will be used to support families dealing with hardships, such as unemployment and health issues, relating to the COVID-19 pandemic. The organization has identified three families who will receive aid in the form of groceries and other supplies as well as additional support where needed.

Good Samaritan House – Donated funds will help residents in Granite City, Ill. to pay outstanding utility bills. They will also provide assistance with vehicle repairs and transportation costs so that individuals may travel to and from work.

The RITE Plan Initiative – The initiative will use the funds to assist residents in East St. Louis, Ill., purchasing food for those families who have been identified and are in need of additional financial support around the holidays.

STL Village – The St. Louis organization will use the donation for their “Grandparents as Parents” program. They have identified seven families residing in the Lewis Place Fountain Park neighborhood who will receive gift cards to be used for the purchase of groceries and children’s toys for Christmas.

“We will miss hosting friends, clients and other members of the community, but it’s more rewarding to help these fine organizations assist those in need,” said Mark Goldenberg, the firm’s founder and managing partner.

For more information on Goldenberg Heller & Antognoli, and updates regarding this year’s giving initiative visit the firm’s website at www.goldenbergheller.com or follow them on Facebook.

USPTO Alert on Ongoing Email Scams Targeting Trademark Owners

The United States Patent and Trademark Office (“USPTO”) has issued an alert about an ongoing email scam involving messages that appear to originate from the USPTO domain (@uspto.gov), but are, in fact, sent by third parties for fraudulent purposes. The USPTO advises trademark owners to be aware that scam messages may: Spoof the USPTO email… Continue reading

The United States Patent and Trademark Office (“USPTO”) has issued an alert about an ongoing email scam involving messages that appear to originate from the USPTO domain (@uspto.gov), but are, in fact, sent by third parties for fraudulent purposes. The USPTO advises trademark owners to be aware that scam messages may:

  • Spoof the USPTO email address (e.g., noreply@uspto.gov)
  • Falsely claim that the USPTO has a new policy requiring separate registration of “clients” and that there is a “penalty” for not complying.
  • Provide incorrect USPTO trademark filing information (e.g., incorrect fee information)

The USPTO has a solicitations webpage that provides a list of examples of solicitations from entities unaffiliated with the USPTO, including known scams, potentially misleading offers and notices, and other non-USPTO solicitations about which the USPTO has received inquiries or complaints.

In light of the increase in fraudulent emails, the USPTO urges all trademark owners and proceedings participants to carefully review any email correspondence that appears to be sent from the USPTO “@uspto.gov” domain and to double-check the information contained in that message by contacting their attorney or independently verifying the information as contained on the USPTO Trademark Status & Document Retrieval database.

We strongly encourage any client receiving email correspondence that appears to be from the USPTO or any third party to not respond directly to such emails. Instead, contact our office to investigate the correspondence and advise on the appropriate course of action. If we filed your application or are representing you in any trademark proceeding, all official correspondence from the USPTO will come to us directly and not to you.

If you have any questions, please contact us.

Paycheck Protection Program Loan Update

On June 5, 2020, the Paycheck Protection Program Flexibility Act (the “Act”) was signed into law.  The Act provides greater flexibility to businesses that obtained loans under the Paycheck Protection Program (“PPP”) by: Extending the covered period during which a loan recipient may use PPP funds for certain expenses while remaining eligible for loan forgiveness… Continue reading

On June 5, 2020, the Paycheck Protection Program Flexibility Act (the “Act”) was signed into law.  The Act provides greater flexibility to businesses that obtained loans under the Paycheck Protection Program (“PPP”) by:

  • Extending the covered period during which a loan recipient may use PPP funds for certain expenses while remaining eligible for loan forgiveness from eight weeks to twenty-four weeks;
  • Extending the deadline to rehire laid off or furloughed workers from June 30th to December 31st, 2020; and
  • Extending the initial two-year loan term to five years.

The Act also increases the percentage of PPP loan proceeds that may be used on qualifying non-payroll costs from 25% to 40%.  At the same time, however, the Act provides that PPP recipients must use at least 60% of the loan amount for payroll costs in order to receive forgiveness of a PPP loan.  This represents a significant departure from the Small Business Administration’s PPP regulations, under which a failure to meet the prior 25% payroll-cost threshold did not completely disqualify a business from receiving forgiveness of a PPP loan.

Personal Injury Form

Please fill out the form below so we may contact you concerning your claim. About Our Firm Goldenberg Heller & Antognoli, P.C. practices in the area of consumer protection and privacy law.  Find out more information about our firm here. The information provided on this website is for general, informative purposes and should not be interpreted… Continue reading

Please fill out the form below so we may contact you concerning your claim.

About Our Firm

Goldenberg Heller & Antognoli, P.C. practices in the area of consumer protection and privacy law.  Find out more information about our firm here.

The information provided on this website is for general, informative purposes and should not be interpreted to indicate that a certain result will occur in any reader’s specific legal situation. The information on this website is not legal advice and does not create an attorney-client relationship. A preliminary communication made via the internet, mail, fax, or telephone does not create an attorney-client relationship or provide any of the protections afforded by that relationship. Goldenberg Heller & Antognoli, P.C. is responsible for the content of this page.

Users of NBA 2K App May Be Entitled to Relief

We are currently investigating claims on behalf of Illinois minors who used the NBA 2K smart phone app. Illinois minors who used one or more of the following NBA 2K smart phone apps to scan their faces into the game may be entitled to $1,000 or more: NBA 2K17 NBA 2K18 NBA 2K19 NBA 2K20 NBA… Continue reading

We are currently investigating claims on behalf of Illinois minors who used the NBA 2K smart phone app.

Illinois minors who used one or more of the following NBA 2K smart phone apps to scan their faces into the game may be entitled to $1,000 or more:

NBA 2K17

NBA 2K18

NBA 2K19

NBA 2K20

NBA 2K21

If you are the parent or guardian of a minor who used the app and wish to learn more, please contact us at 618-656-5150 (just ask to speak to someone about NBA 2K) or simply complete this form:

Illinois Law Protects Your Privacy

Companies collecting biometric identifiers, such as face scans, must comply with the Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act. The law provides damages of $1,000 per negligent violation and $5,000 per willful violation.  We are investigating 2K Sports’ use of facial recognition software on minors (anyone under 18 years of age).

Please contact us to learn more.

About Our Firm

Goldenberg Heller & Antognoli, P.C. practices in the area of consumer protection and privacy law.  Find out more information about our firm here.

This webpage contains advertising material. The information provided on this website is for general, informative purposes and should not be interpreted to indicate that a certain result will occur in any reader’s specific legal situation. The information on this website is not legal advice and does not create an attorney-client relationship. A preliminary communication made via the internet, mail, fax, or telephone does not create an attorney-client relationship or provide any of the protections afforded by that relationship. Goldenberg Heller & Antognoli, P.C. is responsible for the content of this page.

SBA Announces Paycheck Protection Program Certification Safe Harbor

On May 13, 2020, the Small Business Administration (“SBA”) issued guidance regarding a borrower’s good-faith certification concerning the necessity of a Paycheck Protection Program (“PPP”) loan.  All borrowers who, together with their affiliates, receive PPP loans with an original principal amount of less than $2 million will be deemed to have made the required certification… Continue reading

On May 13, 2020, the Small Business Administration (“SBA”) issued guidance regarding a borrower’s good-faith certification concerning the necessity of a Paycheck Protection Program (“PPP”) loan.  All borrowers who, together with their affiliates, receive PPP loans with an original principal amount of less than $2 million will be deemed to have made the required certification in good faith.  Moreover, if the SBA determines that a borrower who obtained more than $2 million dollars through a PPP loan lacked an adequate basis for the required certification, the SBA will not pursue administrative enforcement or referrals to other agencies based on the SBA’s determination with respect to the certification if the borrower repays the amount of the loan in full.

The full text of the SBA’s guidance is available here:   https://www.sba.gov/sites/default/files/2020-05/Paycheck-Protection-Program-Frequently-Asked-Questions_05%2013%2020.pdf

Families First Coronavirus Response Act

Signed into law on March 18, 2020, the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (“FFCRA”) requires covered employees to provide paid leave to workers who are absent from work due to certain COVID-19 related reasons.  The FFCRA applies to employers with fewer than 500 employees.  The FFCRA takes effect on April 1, 2020, and applies to… Continue reading

Signed into law on March 18, 2020, the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (“FFCRA”) requires covered employees to provide paid leave to workers who are absent from work due to certain COVID-19 related reasons.  The FFCRA applies to employers with fewer than 500 employees.  The FFCRA takes effect on April 1, 2020, and applies to leave taken between April 1, 2020, and December 31, 2020.  This post summarizes the main provisions of the FFCRA.

Many issues that employers will face when complying with the FFCRA will require specific legal attention. The material provided in this blog is for informational purposes only and does not constitute legal advice.  Goldenberg Heller & Antognoli, P.C. has a team of skilled business and commercial legal experts who can help navigate the complexities of the law in this rapidly changing environment. Feel free to contact us with your legal needs today.

Emergency Paid Sick Leave Act

  • The FFCRA includes the Emergency Paid Sick Leave Act (“EPSLA”) which mandates that employees be paid for up to two weeks if they are unable to report to work for coronavirus-related reasons.
  • The United States Department of Labor has explained that an employee qualifies for paid leave under the EPSLA if the employee is unable to work (or telework) due to a need for leave because the employee:
      1. Is subject to a Federal, State, or local quarantine or isolation order related to COVID-19;
      2. Has been advised by a health care provider to self-quarantine related to COVID-19;
      3. Is experiencing COVID-19 symptoms and is seeking a medical diagnosis;
      4. Is caring for an individual subject to an order described in (1) or self-quarantine as described in (2);
      5. Is caring for a child whose school or place of care is closed (or child care provider is unavailable) for reasons related to COVID-19; or
      6. Is experiencing any substantially-similar condition specified by the Secretary of Health and Human Services, in consultation with the Secretaries of Labor and Treasury.
  • Full-time employees are entitled to up to eighty hours (two weeks) of leave under the EPSLA. Part-time employees can take the average number of hours they worked during a two-week period in the previous six months.
  • If employees are unable to report to work for reasons 1-3, employees are entitled to pay at their regular rate or the applicable minimum wage, whichever is higher, up to $511 per day and $5,110 in the aggregate.
  • If employees are unable to report to work for reasons 4-6, employees are entitled to pay at 2/3 their regular rate or the applicable minimum wage, whichever is higher, up to $200 per day and $2,000 in the aggregate.
  • Employers cannot force employees to use accrued paid time off, sick leave, or vacation pay in lieu of the benefits provided by the EPSLA. Employees may elect, however, to use any accrued paid time off, vacation pay, or sick leave in lieu of the leave afforded by the EPSLA.
  • The EPSLA contains an anti-retaliation provision, which prohibits employers from retaliating against employees who exercise their rights under the EPSLA.

Emergency Family and Medical Leave Expansion Act

  • The FFCRA also includes the Emergency Family and Medical Leave Expansion Act (“EFMLEA”), which temporarily expands the Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA).
  • The EFMLEA only applies to employees who have been employed for thirty days or more
  • Employees are entitled to leave under the EFMLEA if they are caring for a child whose school or place of care is closed (or child care provider is unavailable) for reasons related to COVID-19.
  • Leave under the EFMLEA is available for a period of 12 weeks. The first two weeks of leave may be paid leave pursuant to the EPSLA and the remaining 10 weeks will be paid leave pursuant to the EFMLEA.
  • Under the EFMLEA, employees are entitled to pay at 2/3 their regular rate or the applicable minimum wage, whichever is higher, up to $200 per day and $12,000 in the aggregate (over the 12-week period).
  • Employers cannot force employees to use accrued paid time off, sick leave, or vacation pay in lieu of the benefits provided by the EFMLEA. Employees may elect, however, to substitute accrued vacation or sick time for the leave provided under the EFMLEA.
  • Leave under the EFMLEA is subject to the provisions of the FMLA requiring employers to restore employees to their prior positions at the conclusion of the leave period. Some exceptions to these requirements are available for employers whose business has been adversely affected by COVID-19.
  • Leave under the EFMLEA is subject to the anti-discrimination and anti-retaliation provisions of the FMLA.

Tax Credits

  • Employers subject to the EPSLA and/or the EFMLEA’s requirements will be reimbursed for the costs of complying with the enactments’ provisions in the form of refundable payroll tax credits.

Exemptions

  • Small businesses with fewer than 50 employees may qualify for exemption from the requirement to provide leave due to school closings or child care unavailability if the requirement would jeopardize the viability of the business as a going concern. Regulations regarding the availability of such exemptions are expected to be issued by the Department of Labor in April.

Notice Requirement

  • The FFCRA requires employers to post a notice from the Department of Labor informing employees of their expanded rights under the new enactment.
  • The poster must be posted in a conspicuous place on the employer’s premises.
  • For employers whose employees are teleworking, an employer can satisfy its notice obligation by direct mailing or emailing the notice to its employees or by posting the notice on an employee information internal or external website.

COVID-19 Fact Sheet

The Coronavirus (COVID-19) Outbreak raises an array of legal issues for businesses. This Fact Sheet provides an overview of some of the key legal issues that Goldenberg Heller & Antognoli, P.C., is monitoring. Updates will be made as they become available. If you have questions about the applicability of any of these issues to your… Continue reading

The Coronavirus (COVID-19) Outbreak raises an array of legal issues for businesses. This Fact Sheet provides an overview of some of the key legal issues that Goldenberg Heller & Antognoli, P.C., is monitoring. Updates will be made as they become available. If you have questions about the applicability of any of these issues to your business, we stand ready to assist.

Workplace Safety

Employee Leave – The Families First Coronavirus Response Act

  • The Families First Coronavirus Response Act (“FFCRA”) was signed into law on March 18, 2020, and will take effect on April 1, 2020.
  • The FFCRA contains two new federal laws requiring employers with less than 500 employees to provide paid leave for certain COVID-19 related absences.
  • Employers will be provided with refundable tax credits to offset the costs associated with complying with these new laws.
  • Small businesses with fewer than 50 employees may qualify for exemption from required leave due to school closings or child care unavailability if the leave requirements would jeopardize the viability of the business as a going concern.
  • The Department of Labor will be releasing a model poster regarding the FFCRA that covered employers will be required to post in a conspicuous location.

Employee Compensation

  • The federal Fair Labor Standards Act and state law impose various requirements on employers with respect to employee pay.
  • These statutes may bear on the payment of final compensation to separated workers and the payment of compensation to workers whose hours have changed as a result of COVID-19.

Unemployment Insurance Benefits

  • Employees who are temporarily laid off because of COVID-19 may qualify for unemployment insurance benefits.
  • Information on unemployment insurance benefits for Illinois workers is available via the following link: https://www2.illinois.gov/ides/Pages/COVID-19-and-Unemployment-Benefits.aspx.
  • Information of unemployment benefits for Missouri workers is available via the following link: https://labor.mo.gov/COVID-19.

Americans with Disabilities Act

  • The Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”) requires that employers make reasonable accommodations for employees with disabilities.
  • Under some circumstances, the ADA may require that employers provide “reasonable accommodations” to employees in connection with COVID-19.
  • The ADA may also bear on communications with employees about COVID-19.

Workers’ Compensation

  • COVID-19-related illness may give rise to workers’ compensation claims if COVID-19 is contracted during the course and scope an employee’s employment.
  • Assessing such claims will require an inquiry into the particular facts and circumstances of the employee’s employment and his or her contraction of COVID-19.

Insurance Coverage

  • Various forms of insurance, including event cancellation insurance, business interruption insurance in commercial property policies, and general liability insurance may be available to mitigate losses arising from the COVID-19 outbreak.

Contracts

  • COVID-19 may raise a number of issues relating to parties’ rights and obligations under their contracts, including whether the COVID-19 outbreak will trigger “force majeure” clauses.

Relief Programs for Businesses

  • The Small Business Administration is offering loan resources to certain small businesses adversely affected by COVID-19. Information on such loan resources is available via the following link: https://www.sba.gov/page/coronavirus-covid-19-small-business-guidance-loan-resources.
  • The Illinois State Treasurer’s Office has announced that it will make available $250 million to Illinois banks and credit unions for the purpose of offering low-interest bridge loans to certain Illinois small-businesses and non-profits. Details regarding this program are available via the following link:  https://www.illinoistreasurer.gov/Invest_in_Illinois/Small_Business_COVID-19_Relief_Program.
  • Relief loans and grants may also available through the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity. Information on such programs is available via the following link: https://www2.illinois.gov/dceo/SmallBizAssistance/Pages/EmergencySBAIntiatives.asp.

Labor Relations & Collective Bargaining Agreements

  • The COVID-19 pandemic has given rise to concerns regarding labor relations, particularly with respect to changing unionized employees’ work schedules or duties, and employees striking or otherwise refusing to perform work as scheduled.

Mandatory Business Closures and Event Restriction

As of March 30, 2020, the following mandatory closures and event attendance limits have been put into place in Illinois, Missouri and the St. Louis Metropolitan Area:

  • Illinois
    • Shelter-in-Place Order
      • Illinois has ordered residents to shelter in place beginning March 21, 2020 at 5:00pm. This order will continue through April 30, 2020.
      • Persons may leave their homes or place of residence only for Essential Activities (such as seeking medical services, obtaining medical supplies, going to the grocery store), Essential Governmental Functions, or to operate Essential Businesses and Operations.
    • All businesses and operations in the State, except Essential Businesses and Operations, are required to cease all activities within the State except Minimum Basic Operations (meaning the minimum necessary activities to maintain the value of the business’s inventory, preserve the condition of the business’s physical plant and equipment, ensure security, process payroll and employee benefits, or for related functions).
    • Businesses may continue remote operations.
    • All public and private gatherings of any number of people occurring outside a single household or living unit are prohibited.
    • Any gathering of more than ten people is prohibited unless otherwise exempted.
    • All travel, including, but not limited to, travel by automobile, motorcycle, scooter, bicycle, train, plane, or public transit, except Essential Travel and Essential Activities is prohibited.
    • Examples of “Essential Businesses and Operations” include:
      • Healthcare and Public Health Operations
      • Human Services Operations
      • Essential infrastructure (i.e. food productions, distribution, and sale; construction; building management and maintenance; utility operations)
      • Stores that sell groceries and medicine
      • Food, beverage, and cannabis production and agriculture
      • Organizations that provide charitable and social services (such as food banks, shelters)
      • Media
      • Gas stations and businesses need for transportation
      • Financial institutions
      • Hardware and supply stores
      • Critical trades (i.e. plumbers, electricians, security staff, cleaning and janitorial staff)
      • Mail, post, shipping, logistics, delivery, and pick-up services
      • Educational institutions
      • Laundry services
      • Restaurants for consumption off-premises
      • Stores that sell supplies to work from and supplies for Essential Businesses and Operations
      • Transportation
      • Home-based care and services
      • Residential facilities and shelters
      • Professional services (i.e. legal services, accounting services)
      • Day care centers for employees exempted from the shelter-in-place order
      • Manufacture, distribution, and supply chain for critical products and industries
      • Critical labor union functions (i.e. administration of health and welfare funds)
      • Hotels and motels
      • Funeral services
  • Missouri:
    • Missouri is restricting any gatherings statewide to no more than 10 people.
    • Casinos have been instructed to close through March 30, 2020.
  • St. Louis Metropolitan Area:
    • In St. Louis City, St. Louis County, and St. Charles County, all bars have been ordered to close. Restaurant services have been limited to delivery, carry out, and curbside services only. Customers will not be allowed in dining rooms and bars. This ban and limitations will take effect beginning the evening of March 19 and will continue for an undetermined period of time.
    • St. Louis and St. Louis County will require people to shelter-in-place beginning Monday, March 30, 2020. Residents will still be able to go to the grocery store and pharmacy, and will be able to walk in public parks

 


Goldenberg Heller & Antognoli, P.C. has a team of skilled business and commercial legal experts who can help navigate the complexities of the law in this rapidly changing environment. Feel free to contact us with your legal needs today.